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Posts Tagged ‘History & Culture’

Activity-Based Consequential Learning (by doing!)

Stan Herd Pollinator Stamp

At Pendleton’s Market “Pollination Station” celebration of crop artist Stan Herd’s USPS-66044 Swallowtail Stamp, we found a Freedom’s Frontier prescription (Rx) for Wes Jackson’s Eco-Futures description (Dx) of “vision without sight/site.” WakarUSAWatershedPollinationStation Pix

– Boardmember Bob Burkhart

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Pendleton’s Market Map to Pendleton’s
1446 E. 1850 Rd., Lawrence, KS 66046 Phone: 785-843-1409

 

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From The Lawrence Journal World June 14, 2007

Construction of a new 4,800-square-foot museum at Clinton Lake could begin this fall.

A preliminary design will be on display during an open house and fundraiser this weekend at the Wakarusa River Valley and Heritage Museum in Bloomington Park at Clinton Lake. The approximately $400,000 museum would be built nearby, according to its director, Martha Parker…..

more…

http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2007/jun/14/open_house_help_fund_new_museum_lake/

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From The Topeka Capital-Journal July 8, 2007

>>Imagine wading through waist or even chest-deep water, feeling with your feet and hands as you go. You encounter a hole and your heart rate quickens. You take a deep breath and submerge to the entrance of the hole, sticking your hand slowly inside. All of a sudden and without warning, a huge catfish chomps on your hand and the battle is on. Sound like fun? Depending on your perspective it could be, but most people have another word for it.

“Different areas of the country call it different things,” said Fostana Jenkins of the typical terminology of fishing with your hands. “Some call it noodling, tickling, hogging, grabbling, but the number one thing is probably CRAZY!”

To read this article, please visit:
http://www.cjonline.com/stories/070807/out_183059434.shtml

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Alison Reber has sent you an Article from the Indian Country Today website.
Kansas: Lawrence – Wakarusa Wetlands Save the Wakarusa Wetlands Inc. – an association of Lawrence, Kan.,-based Haskell Indian Nations University alumni, students and community supporters – will observe National Prayer Day at sunrise June 21 in the wetlands south of Lawrence. The ceremony will be led by Jimm Goodtracks, Otoe-Missouria, assisted by Mike Smith, Dene, and is open to all who wish to add their prayers to save this sacred place from the highway builders. Jeremy Shield, Crow, will again sing a song to greet the sun. Participants will ask for the protection of the Wakarusa Wetlands (aka Haskell-Baker Wetlands), threatened by an eight-lane highway project approved by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, but delayed by state budget constraints. After years of claiming the trafficway had been ”de-federalized,” in an attempt to render federal laws protecting Native sites inapplicable, the Federal Highway Administration is back in the game. It recently announced its intent to adopt an outdated and severely flawed Corps of Engineers environmental impact statement in order to expedite federal funds for the beleaguered project. As has happened so often in this long struggle, the announcement of a decision, promised by March, had been postponed until after Haskell students left for summer vacation. A lawsuit is pending if KDOT proceeds with construction. This sacred place is the last significant trace of the original Wakarusa Bottoms, an 18,000-acre prairie wetland environment that existed for thousands of years before the draining and damming of the wetlands, which supplied Native peoples of the region with valuable medicines and important ceremonial items.

Elders have said the Creator caused the course of the Wakarusa River to go directly east toward the rising sun, in sharp contrast to the other rivers in the region, as a sign of sacred healing plants and herbs to be gathered there. About 600 acres of the Wakarusa Wetlands was located directly south of the dorms at Haskell Institute. The last major remnant of this wetland became a refuge where young Indian people from all across the country survived government efforts to exterminate their cultures during the off-reservation boarding school years. There, in the wetland refuge, young Indian people from Maine to California sang forbidden songs, performed dances that were federally punishable with jail time and refused to let the authorities ”kill the Indian” in them. Parents and other tribal leaders camped, often for weeks, beside these wetlands on the bank of the Wakarusa awaiting permission from school officials to retrieve or at least visit their children. Despite efforts to drain the wetland in the early 20th century, and Haskell’s loss of this property during the termination era, the Wakarusa Wetland, like Haskell Indian Nations University itself, has survived and flourished. The entire historic Haskell campus, including the wetlands, is reportedly being considered for designation as a National Historic Heritage area. Contact Michael Caron at (785) 842-6293 or mcaron@sunflower.com with Save the Wakarusa Wetlands in the subject line, or visit http://www.savethewetlands.org; Lori Tapahonso, executive assistant/public information officer, Haskell Indian Nations University, at (785) 830-2715 or LTapahonso@HASKELL.edu; or RaeLynn Butler, president, Haskell Wetland Preservation Organization, Haskell Indian Nations University, at Rbutler@HASKELL.edu.

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The latest newsletter is now digitally available in all it’s 12 page glory.

Many moons ago writing for a fall 2006 newsletter began. Somewhere along the way we decided that one big newsletter might be a manageable way to demonstrate the breadth of the organization. It took a while but we finally got the whole thing written, formatted, printed, folded, and addressed. Ideally we would have been able to send out many more copies but limited funds have meant limiting many things. Don’t let the January 2007 print date deter you from enjoying the contents of this impressive publication. It’s a keeper.

PS We could definitely use a hand getting the future newsletters produced. Contributions of elbow grease or dollars would be fantastic.

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Can digital technologies and storytelling facilitate community-based education?

Spinning yarns around the digital fire

…Storytelling brings people together in a common perspective, and stretches everyone’s capacity to empathize with others and share experience” [3]….. Collaborative and group–based activities can promote prosocial behavior, or “positive social interaction skills such as cooperation, sharing, kindness, helping, showing affection and verbalizing feelings” [10]…. This increasing awareness of the importance of communities in learning environments includes ways to use computers and technology in order to encourage collaboration [11]. In what ways can digital technologies (in particular the Internet) add new dimensions to dialogue, storytelling, or collaboration?

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KVHA is pleased to announce the release of Catfish Cookies, the first in a new community storytelling series called River Roots. The primary author, Barbara Higgins-Dover, shares a bit of family river history with the readers. Alison Reber, the book’s editor, wrote several environmental history pieces. StreamLink’s Gabrielle Iversen illustrated the book using original watercolor paintings.  See the website http://www.catfishcookies.org  
for a listing of location the book is available or to purchase the book online.

Catfish Cookies compliments a river history exhibit at the University of Kansas’ Dyche Natural History Museum, and is being used as a spring board for discussion about river protection. Recordings and web-based extensions are planned.

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